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Molecular epidemiology of rodent-, shrew- and bat-borne hantaviruses in Mbeya region, Tanzania

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dc.contributor.author Sudi, Lwitiho Edwin
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-29T10:54:49Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-29T10:54:49Z
dc.date.issued 2019-03
dc.identifier.uri http://dspace.nm-aist.ac.tz/handle/123456789/246
dc.description A Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfilment for the Requirements of the Master’s in Life Sciences of the Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology en_US
dc.description.abstract Hantaviruses, family Bunyaviridae are emerging zoonotic RNA viruses, which originates from rodents, bats and shrews. Expanded diversity of Hantaviruses with their respective reservoir host in Africa stimulates the research on Hantavirus distribution among reservoir hosts as well as the assessment of knowledge, attitude and practices on Hantavirus infections at the community level in Mbeya region. Cross section surveys conducted between July 2017 and September 2018, involved the trapping of rodents, shrews and bats on residential areas, agricultural fields and forest areas and assessing the level of knowledge, attitude and practices on Hantavirus infections at the community level in Mbeya region. Necropsies from the internal organs were collected and screened for Hantavirus using Han-L PCR. Positive samples were purified and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis was done to assess the evolutionary relationship among Hantavirus strains. Only (6/334) 1.8% of all bat species trapped were positive for Hantavirus while rodents and shrews were found to be negative. Mops condylurus was confirmed to carry Hantavirus in Mbeya region. The maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed a previous unidentified bat borne Hantavirus strain named Kiwira virus. In addition, the community has a low level of knowledge and higher practices, which may favor the transmission of the Hantavirus from the reservoir host to human population and this, endanger the community health. The discovery of new Hantavirus strain on free-tailed bats (Mops condylurus) in Kyela district expands the diversity of Hantavirus reservoir host in Africa. Informing the society about Hantavirus infections is more important as far as public health is concerned. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher NM-AIST en_US
dc.subject Research Subject Categories::NATURAL SCIENCES en_US
dc.title Molecular epidemiology of rodent-, shrew- and bat-borne hantaviruses in Mbeya region, Tanzania en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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